Gregory K. Lawrence

Gregory K. Lawrence focuses his practice on the electricity and natural gas industries. He is experienced appearing before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and multiple state utility commissions regarding regulatory proceedings, compliance and enforcement, capacity and energy market structure, transactions and negotiations, asset transfers, and governmental affairs. Greg’s clients include funds and financial institutions, marketers, traders, renewable and other project developers, energy storage and demand response assets, municipal and investor-owned utilities, and large energy consumers.

Recognized as a leading energy and electricity lawyer by Chambers USA, Greg is a frequent speaker at energy industry conferences and a contributor to a wide range of publications, including The Electricity Journal, Electric Light & Power, Energy Risk, Bloomberg Law Reports, Project Finance International, Corporate Counsel, Windpower Engineering, and EnergyLaw 360. He also authored a quarterly column in Electric Energy T&D Magazine and “Rationalizing Supply with Demand: Electricity Demand Response in U.S. Wholesale Electricity Markets,” a book chapter in U.S. Law and Taxation.

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The US Attorney, CFTC, and Navinder Sarao

We have previously provided updates1 on the Navinder Singh Sarao case, pending in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.  After being charged in February 2015 with fraud and spoofing related to the 2010 Flash Crash, Sarao, then resident in the United Kingdom, fought a yearlong, multiple-appeal battle against extradition, before he … Continue Reading

Coscia Gets 3 Years in Prison: The Criminalization of Trading Commodities?

Sarao, Coscia, and now the Berkshire Power Company, each charged with crimes – spoofing, fraud, false information – relating to commodity trading. Commodity traders likely have incorporated into their compliance regimes the general risk that allegations of criminal fraud could arise. These criminal matters no longer appear to be isolated instances and, instead, counsel for … Continue Reading
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